Wednesday, 23 September 2009

Bidding in Builth

Off to the National Ram Sale on Monday to buy a ram (obviously), but also some ewes.
The aptly named Toyboy is now too closely related to the breeding flock so has gone off to bonk his way across Exmoor leaving me to head to Wales on the hunt for his replacement.
Those auction palpitations never fail to get you. The females aren't so much of a problem as you can buy as many or as few as you have room for in the trailer, so an extra one here or there doesn't matter. But a ram? I only want one Torddu ram, and there are several possibilities in the various pens, so when do I bid, and when not? I can't afford NOT to come home with one as it'll mean yet more expensive traipsing around the country, what with the majority being in Wales and very few if any in Devon, but I can't come home with two. That really puts the pressure on. I mark my catalogue with those I don't want - too fat (loads of them are wobbly with fat rather than muscle and I want a working not a show ram), too young (I need a proven sire), too ugly (personal bias), problematic horns and so on. I bid for one that comes before my preferred choice but the auctioneer doesn't see me wave my catalogue even though I am sat right in front of him and by now have had several sheep knocked down to me, so I am a real bidder, parting with genuine dosh. Ah well. My fave then comes into the ring and I get all excited - he is a really big chap, sound, strong, muscular, great horns, with a fabulously endowed set of bollocks. Just what I need. No. Rewind. Just what my ewes need.
Just a couple of other bidders are interested as they are mostly showing folk at this Badger Face Society annual show and sale, and he has the attributes of a worker. He's knocked down to me at a decent price.
Wormed and vaccinated he is now in the ram's paddock, looking a little lost, stamping his feet, snorting through his nostrils, every ounce trembling with testosterone. If he breathed fire I wouldn't be surprised, so I'm not going to introduce him to Samson until tupping is finished. If the two rams get into a fight and something happens, that's zero lamb next year.

7 comments:

Yorkshire Pudding said...

Thank heavens women don't have to pick their partners in this way. No attention given to educational qualifications, character strengths, smalltalk skills or sensitivity. Instead it just boils down to sex drive. What a load of bollocks!

colouritgreen said...

it's amazing when a ram runs, all that tackle swaying side to side...


why dd you choose a welsh breed? just liked it?

Winchester whisperer said...

What are you calling him: Toyboy 2?

Mopsa said...

YP - a ram is only good for one thing - he ain't no humourist or conversationalist. He can't even mend a dripping tap.

CIG - I;ve had Badger Faces for a dozen years - taste amazing, look lovely, hardy , great mums etc etc - wanna buy some? I have 10 lovely ewe lambs for sale!

WW - Roger. What else?

colouritgreen said...

thanks for the offer, but we are full up sheep-wise (both in field and freezer!)

nah i was just wondring why you picked a breed not common to this area

Mopsa said...

CIG - we chose the breed for looks, taste, size and hardiness when living in the Midlands - so not too far from Shropshire, herefordshire and Wales where there are quite a few flocks. We liked them so much we didnt want to change when moving down to Devon, and to be honest, to keep good diversity in bloodlines its not long before you have to travel to get a new ram anyway as anyone local is likely to have your stocklines mixed in with theirs. Most Devon farmers head to Cumbria to get their mules each year - Builth is nowhere near as far to travel!

Winchester whisperer said...

Love it!